Fecal Sludge Management - Innovations and New Learnings

Molly_Goodwin-Kucinsky on 26/05/2018 05:39 AEST

Background: As more countries set and attain open defecation free (ODF) goals through concerted efforts to drive sanitation uptake, the next challenge is how to ensure safe management of waste as latrine pits fill. Donors, implementers, government agencies and the WASH sector as a whole are increasingly focusing on the problem of  faecal sludge management (FSM) and searching for innovative, feasible, and cost-effective solutions.

Objective: During this discussion hosted by iDE, CSOs will share their research around FSM, experiences and insights from recent programming, and opportunities to accelerate progress towards safely managed sanitation.

Timing: This e-dicussion will be actively facilitated from June 4-7, 2018.

Facilitation: This e-discussion will be facilitated by Molly Goodwin-Kucinsky, iDE's Global WASH Knowledge Manager. She has ten years of experience in the development sector, with expertise in WASH, market-based programming, and gender and social inclusion. iDE pioneered market-based approaches in the WASH sector that incorporate private businesses, NGOs and government stakeholders. Since iDE Vietnam launched the world’s first market-based sanitation program in 2003, this model has been successfully replicated across iDE’s global portfolio and by other organizations. iDE currently works in six countries to improve sanitation coverage using an approach called Sanitation Marketing.

 

Discussion

Over the course of this week, we will be discussing various aspects of FSM, ranging from the existing landscape and value chain to emerging trends and promising innovations. A new question will be posted each day to keep the discussion moving forward and bring forth new topics. We are interested in hearing more about your experience with FSM and how your organization is planning to or has begun addressing this topic. Many CSOs have conducted research and activities designed to ensure waste is safely managed after latrines have been installed. Others are just beginning their efforts in this area. We hope this week will provide an opportunity to exchange knowledge and insights that can drive the sector forward.

We are interested to learn how you are identifying and coordinating with key stakeholders around the issue of FSM. Please introduce yourself and the organization you are working with when joining the discussion.

The first questions we'd like to hear from you on are: 

Who are the key actors positioned to deliver FSM products and services in your context? How are you engaging with them to move forward on this issue? Please introduce yourself and the organization you are working with when joining the discussion. 

Discussion

Anonymous's picture
Non comment but I am ready to participate
Anonymous's picture
Am a water resources engineer from Uganda willing to participate in the e-discussion
Anonymous's picture
WASH Project Mgr in Ghana, willing to participate in the discussion s
Anonymous's picture
I would love to join the discussion and share professional experiences
Anonymous's picture
Looking forward to discussions
Anonymous's picture
I am a researcher and running WASH projects in Pakistan. In Pakistan we do not have any fecal sludge management (FSM) system in place. To address this challenge we need to bring together the key players of the field like governments, academics, researchers, funding agencies and industries, so that this global initiative of FSM could be addressed.
Anonymous's picture
Looking to see what innovative options there are in terms of energy from waster applications and where they have been scaled.
Anonymous's picture
It will be very interesting, I'm in
Anonymous's picture
Who will pay for the poor?
Anonymous's picture
Ready to participate :)
Anonymous's picture
Ready to participate in this interesting discussion.
Anonymous's picture
In many of the context where we have worked farmers and small-scale service providers one the key stakeholders. However, they often lack the capital and technical capacity to effectively deal with safety related issues.
Molly_Goodwin-Kucinsky's picture
Hi all,

We are excited to see so much interest in this topic and look forward to learning from your experiences. Please be sure to join us next week when the e-discussion begins on June 4.
Anonymous's picture
I would like to receive an email update when there is a new contribution made to this discussion.
Bronwyn Powell's picture
Hi Le Huong. Thanks for joining the e-discussion. Now that you've added a comment you will receive all future notifications and comments on the discussion
Anonymous's picture
Interesting and fruitful.
Anonymous's picture
Super initiative - Looking forward to the discussion!
Anonymous's picture
I would like to join the e-discussion on this topic and learn.
Anonymous's picture
I would like to join the e-discussion on this topic and learn.
Anonymous's picture
Timely and very important subject discussion. Look forward
Anonymous's picture
BCC Advisor, SNV Bhutan
Anonymous's picture
I look forward to the discussions on safe management of Fecal Sludge
Anonymous's picture
Recent university graduate looking to learn more about innovative faecal sludge management solutions.
Anonymous's picture
Looking forward to it!
Godwin_Kamtukule's picture
I am excited to be part of this an interesting discussion!
Anonymous's picture
excited to be part of discussion
Anonymous's picture
Director and co-founder of Whitten & Roy Partnership. We work very closely with several IDE WASH programs to implement sanitation marketing solutions. Currently we are working with IDE Cambodia to promote “dual pit’ solutions via the existing concrete producers who have manufactured latrines for over 300,000 buyers in 7 provinces. We also work with Sanergy in Kenya, which recycles human waste and produces high-quality organic fertilizer. We have collaborated with Sanergy to develop and implement a selling strategy for Evergrow, which is sold to vegetable farmers in Kenya. We are very committed to working with our clients to find ways to commercialize the transformation of faecal sludge.
Molly_Goodwin-Kucinsky's picture
Hi Scott,

Thanks for sharing this background and joining the conversation. We look forward to hearing more later in the week when we dive into the FSM value chain.
Molly_Goodwin-Kucinsky's picture
Hi everyone,

We are excited to kick off this e-discussion which will run June 4-7. Please introduce yourself and the organization you are working with when joining the discussion.

The first questions we'd like to hear from you on are:

Who are the key actors positioned to deliver FSM products and services in your context? How are you engaging with them to move forward on this issue?
Anonymous's picture
I want to attend in the the e discussion on FSM
Anonymous's picture
Hello everyone, I'm Quang, from iDE Vietnam. In Vietnam, the government plays a significant role in promoting sanitation and hygiene. At the provincial level, the Center for Preventive Medicine under the Department of Health is practically responsible for regulating technical standards around latrine designs and the Women’s Union is also actively engaged in WASH promotion efforts. For this reason, iDE Vietnam partners with these two groups to deliver WASH products and services. Under our current program, iDE Vietnam takes a Training-of-Trainers (ToT) approach to build government capacity in market-based WASH delivery, training government staff at the provincial and district levels in how to enable lower-level staff to engage with WASH market actors and customers. More details on this approach are found in our recent Tactic Report (https://s3.amazonaws.com/www.ideglobal.org/files/public/iDE-TR_VN_WASH_TOT.pdf?mtime=20171107234440). Although we are just beginning to explore the issue of FSM, given the government’s continued interest in WASH, we will be working closely with them for future interventions.
Anonymous's picture
Hello, I'm Tyler with iDE Cambodia.

iDE takes a market-based approach to WASH and, in our flagship Cambodia program, works through a network of rural, small-scale entrepreneurs to deliver sustainable sanitation, water, hygiene, and FSM solutions. These entrepreneurs and their businesses are well-positioned to deliver to the last-mile, rural customers that iDE programs serve.

In iDE’s experience, latrine producers sometimes consider themselves to be in the construction business, but not in the sanitation business. They may be willing to install a toilet, but are often uninterested in providing FSM services. In our experience, latrine producers have had a difficult time retaining staff to install FSM products, like extra pits, that may necessitate cutting pipes filled with sludge. In addition, the profit margin on extra pits is not as high as the complete latrine product, which includes underground components, a tiled slab, and a latrine pan.

However, as the market for first-time latrine buyers shrinks, we’re seeing an increased interest among business owners to sell products like extra pits that can be alternated to let one dry and be safely composted while the other is being used. Sometimes businesses can use a nudge to start selling these types of products. By introducing FSM products to business owners, demonstrating their profitability, providing hygienic installation training, and stimulating demand for their products, iDE has had success engaging rural construction businesses for FSM. We have yet to scale our FSM pilot (which is selling alternating dual pit upgrades) beyond one province in Cambodia, but we have gauged high demand among business owners and customers to start delivering FSM products in iDE’s other operating areas
Molly_Goodwin-Kucinsky's picture
Hi Tyler,

Thanks for sharing this experience from Cambodia. Very interesting to hear the ways the team is engaging and incentivizing businesses to deliver FSM solutions. We look forward to hearing more details on this as part of the FSM value chain discussion later this week. Are there other stakeholders the team engages around FSM, such as government or other NGOS?
Anonymous's picture
Thanks for the question, Molly. The WASH sector here in Cambodia, comprised of both local and international NGOs in addition to the Cambodian Ministry of Rural Development, is becoming more and more active on the topic of FSM. Stakeholders meet regularly at an FSM-specific meeting, and the FSM topic has been presented upon with feedback at other water and sanitation-related meetings. These fora have been great information sharing platforms for NGOs conducting FSM-related research, most recently WaterSHED and PSI Cambodia. The WASH sector has also agreed to prioritize the development of a set of FSM guidelines that would seek government endorsement. While the final goal of these guidelines isn't firmly established at this point, it is the hope that they would serve as a foundation for NGO-led sanitation activities and future government regulation. iDE is prioritizing its engagement with the sector on FSM and is optimistic about the collaborative solutions the sector and government can develop on this very tricky subject.
Anonymous's picture
I would like to join with the discussion
Anonymous's picture
Hi,
I am Binod Mishra, managing the WASH Program in Nepal. We have just completed phase 2 Sanitation Marketing Program supported by multiple donors. SanMark program had given priority in promoting dual pit latrines which to some extent had been addressing the sludge management at the household level on an adhoc basis. We look forward for an more systemic management of the fecal sludge.
Molly_Goodwin-Kucinsky's picture
Hi Binod,

Thank you for sharing insights from Nepal. Several programs are exploring dual pits and we look forward to learning more about this model throughout the week. Does your team anticipate engaging any new stakeholders to deliver FSM compared to latrine deliveries, or engaging existing stakeholders in new ways?
Anonymous's picture
Hi Molly,

At this stage we are working on for the continuation of the recently phased out program with FSM as a major component. HH level FSM is yet to be well designed. It has been reported that a pit takes about 5-6 years for a family of 5 to fill up. HH having dual pit would have sufficient to address/empty the pit after shifting sludge pipe to other pit. We have an issue of more than 55% HH having single pit due space issue.
Anonymous's picture
Hey! this is Md Masum Hossain , right now I am working with iDE Bangladesh as Field Team Leader under SanMarkS Project since 2015 before that I had involved with PROOFS Project as Expert WASH. We are working for rural consumers for their improve sanitation development through engage the Led Firm RFL, , Public Sector -DPHE, Local Government Union Parishad, Civil Societies and School authorities and should be centered by the Rural Sanitation Entrepreneur, The finished product assembled by the RSE , locally we called Private Latrine Producer-PLP. A holistic Sanitation Market Systems we are operating in 6 district of Bangladesh and cover 450000 poor and disadvantaged people by developing 500 PLPs and many support service providers ( dealers, mason, sales agents, Sweepers etc). The five types of technologies we are promoting - Primary ( Single direct pit with SaTo Pan), Secondary ( Single Pit offset by SaTo and Collection box) , Honors ( Single pit offset by SanBox) , Masters ( double pit offset) and President ( Ceramic pan / SanBox ) offset Septic Tank. All products are promoting considering FSM at Rural Context. Our 100 PLPs of Barishal Hub almost sales 15000 sets within 24 months and peoples are getting benefit from the technologies on FSM like; no bad smell, no connection with water body,save time and long time need to fill up the pit than traditional technology, easy to pit emptying, customers are connected with Sweepers so that when filled up the pit then they can call the sweepers for pit empty. Hygienic way pit empty and and somewhere users can himself empty the pit and sludge is using for Agriculture field fertility increase.
Through the SanMarkS Project we are facilitating /working for whole Sanitation Journey ( Offsite - Onsite) with maintaining Quality Products( use Quality input for making materials and curing, transportation, installation and post services) which is contributing to FSM sustainable way.
Molly_Goodwin-Kucinsky's picture
Thank you for sharing your team's approach to working across a system of government actors and private sector support services to address FSM. What challenges or potential opportunities has your team identified in trying to engage so many different stakeholders to work towards a common goal of increased access to safe FSM?
Anonymous's picture
Very good morning!
Yes we are working with many stakeholders through SanMarkS , like Govt and Private Sector
There is huge challenges in FSM in Bangladesh specially in rural context also urban. In urban very few households have opportunity to have FSM, just line with urban drain and Septic tank. So that in rainy season all waste water comes to road and enter into the households courtyard and this is very common in Bangladesh.
At the same time, in rural context we have achieved 100% ODF very recently but sustainable manner is absent , government and private stakes have very little concern about FSM. Only some prominent development organization ( Practical Action, iDE, Oxfam) is creating some pilot field towards create awareness to the Government and private sector. The led plastic company RFL has introduced a Mobile Toilet where they have thought on FSM but it is very few in market place. DPHE and WASA is trying but maximum is under in planning. There is huge lack of knowledge and practice of government and private sectors actors. In field level folks are very layman and they have little concern about FSM. In 2007 during the Care taker government in Bangladesh Mr. Anoarul Iqbal, the Minister of Local Government had given a circular for FSM and allocate funds for ECHO TOILET Project and it was BDT 12000.00/ ECHO TOILET in each Union of Bangladesh( Bangladesh has 4500 unions and in each union there is average HHs size is 6000-7000 jnos). Mr. Iqbal was mobilized by prominent journalist and development worker ( focus on Agriculture) Mr, Sayekh Siraj and Mr. Siraj was capture a case story from Bangladesh Agriculture Rural Development- BARD , Kumilla, Bangladesh from Dr Masud Chowdhury. But after the care taker government it was not scale up due to without mobilize the people it was introduced and nobody taken the responsibility later on.
Anonymous's picture
Please Read ECO- TOILET instead of ECHO TOILET in my previous comments
Anonymous's picture
ECO TOILET Video - Bangladesh ,
Promoted by SPACE NGO
You Tube : Eco Toilet and Organic Composting.flv
Anonymous's picture
iDE Bangladesh is also promoting FilTo ( Filter Toilet) at rural areas where iDE is working , PROOFS and SanMarkS is the facilitating the technology considering FSM.
This is already shared by our Associate Director -Jess inn last week with the Global Falks through Webinier

It is proved that FilTo is the best toilet for FSM for rural individual households
Learning and others specification can be shared in next

Anonymous's picture
I work as Practical Action's Urban WASH & Markets Advisor and would love to participate and share insights from our FSM work in Bangladesh and Kenya. I look forward to it
Molly_Goodwin-Kucinsky's picture
Hi Noemie,

Thanks for joining the discussion. We would love to hear more about your organization's approach. Who are the key actors you're engaging in Bangladesh and Kenya to move forward on FSM? How are the stakeholders the same or different in these two contexts?
Anonymous's picture
Namaste, I am Sanna, the Chief Technical Adviser of a bi-lateral WASH project by the governments of Nepal and Finland (more on us on www.rwsspwn.org.np). We have been struggling with the definition of 'safely managed sanitation' and concluded that all other options other than double-pit Sulabh, are not safely managed. This is also not enough: if both pits are filling up at the same time, these re not safe either. Also septic tanks fall into this category as in most of the locations we do not know what happens to the content. Who are the key actors? I would say private sector who has a business case. It cannot be a free service that some programme/INGO/government body keeps providing even if some subsidy from these would probably be good. Instead of charging the tankers to deposit their loads at the designated places, they should get a reward for doing it. Yet, tankers are also not an option in most of our rural working municipalities. I am looking forward seeing what kind of ideas will come up in this discussion.
Molly_Goodwin-Kucinsky's picture
Hello Sanna,

Thanks for sharing some learnings from Nepal. The subsidy question and relative role of the private sector and the public sector is quite interesting. How are you engaging the private sector to address FSM? What kinds of challenges or opportunities for coordination between the private sector and NGOs or government on this issue have you identified?
James Harper's picture
Hello.

I'm James Harper with the University of Colorado Boulder. I'm a researcher and PhD student that focuses on how behavior affects FSM in rural contexts. My research plans include 1) describing the FSM decision-making processes of rural latrine owners when their pits fill; 2) describing the availability, barriers to entry, and associated topics of FSM service providers in rural contexts; and 3) identify behavior change techniques that increase the frequency of safely managed FS.

I am looking forward to this discussion and am always looking to collaborate or just chat about sanitation. Feel free to email me at james.harper@colorado.edu.

And thank you to the organizers, DFAT and iDE! This is a great idea.
Molly_Goodwin-Kucinsky's picture
Thanks for joining the conversation. We look forward to hearing your insights throughout the week as we continue to explore the issue of FSM delivery.

Pages